Kid Friendly & Parent Approved Acupuncture

I am often asked how young is too young to get acupuncture and I always answer, never!  I have been treating this young guy since he was just about 4 years old for respiratory issues.  As you can imagine he was against being needled so we worked within his own comfort zone and used cupping, essentials oils, acupressure and massage.  He is now 11 years old and he finally gave me the go ahead to start needling him. 

Sports are a huge part of his life and he had some tension in his low back.  Although he was still a bit nervous I used what I call “baby needles” and it was a piece of cake.  He could not believe how easy it was and was back in the game after just one treatment. 

As a practitioner, it is important to understand and respect each individual’s boundaries and limitations.  Not every treatment has to consist of needles and not every needle is the right type.  There are other modalities to incorporate into a treatment or in lieu of needles as well as many types of needles to accommodate different levels of sensitivity.

If you and/or your child is hesitant to begin acupuncture please call 908.288.7682 to speak with me so that we can work as a team to create a treatment plan that best suits both of your needs.

Kid Friendly & Parent Approved Acupuncture, TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. offers Acupuncture, Anxiety and Depression, Pain Management, Allergies, Infertility, Acupuncture Scotch Plains in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

Cupping Is Not Just for Athletes

Cupping Is Not Just for Athletes, TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, WarrenWith the media’s attention on the Olympics, cupping has been brought to the forefront of Chinese Medicine.  It was once a fairly unknown modality, but now everyone is asking about its benefits and it is about time! 

Cupping is a therapy that complements acupuncture, which serves to accelerate healing in being used alone or in conjunction with needling. One of the greatest modalities that Chinese Medicine has to offer is fire cupping because its benefits can serve almost everyone.

Cupping is the term used for the process of strategically placing glass cups over specific points of the body and/or affected area and creating a suction to draw toxins out of the body while at the same time nourishing the area with qi and blood. Cupping is similar to a massage, however there is a difference in its purpose. Whereas massage applies an inward pressure into the muscles, cupping draws the muscle upward.  It is often described as an inverted massage that pulls the fascia upward and draws blood to the area.  Where there is blood, there is oxygen, and the combination promotes a faster recovery.

The effects of the heated suction and the inverse pressure can soothe aching muscles, promote qi and blood, as well as calm the nervous system. But the benefits do not stop there. Cupping is also a great treatment for the lungs; it can alleviate allergies and chest congestion, ailments of the common cold or flu, and other respiratory issues.

Please remember that cupping should always be performed by a licensed professional who has received training from an accredited institution.  If you would like to schedule a visit or talk more about the benefits of Chinese Medicine please feel free to call 908.288.7682.

Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)
TLC Acupuncture
908.288.7682
346 South Avenue
Suite 4
Fanwood, NJ 07023

 

Music as Medicine

Music as Medicine, TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

I came across this post today and wanted to share it. I found it interesting and music is something that most of us have access to and enjoy.

The Chinese word, or character, for medicine comes from the character for music.
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FROM AN INTERVIEW with GAO YUAN
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Q: There is an old belief, now being revisited, that music has the power to heal. Where does this idea come from, and how does it apply to traditional Chinese music?

GY: Our ancestors believed that music had the power to harmonize a person’s soul in ways that medicine could not. In ancient China, one of music’s earliest purposes was for healing. The Chinese word, or character, for medicine actually comes from the character for music.

During the time of the Great Yellow Emperor (2698-2598 B.C.E.), people discovered the relationship between the pentatonic scale, the five elements, and the health five internal and five sensory organs. During Confucius time, scholars used music’s calming properties to improve strengthen people’s character and conduct.

Today, scientific research has also validated music’s therapeutic ability to lower blood pressure, reduce anxiety, enhance concentration, stabilize heart rate, and more

Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)
TLC Acupuncture
908.288.7682
346 South Avenue
Suite 4
Fanwood, NJ 07023

Acupuncture for Spring Allergies

by Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)

Acupuncture for Spring Allergies, TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

Springtime has finally arrived and for many people it has brought seasonal allergies along with it.  Although it is always best to come in for preventative treatments, allergy symptoms can still be effectively treated with acupuncture. 

According to Chinese medicine, spring is a season that is more yang in nature and is also referred to as the season of renewal.  Meaning it is more active, things rise, and life begins to stir again.  Flowers bloom, trees become green, and pollen is most prevalent.  It is also the season of the liver and gall bladder and this is important to understand for several reasons.  The liver becomes most active in the spring and when there is an imbalance it can generate internal wind.  An easier way to correlate this to your health is by looking outside and observing nature.  When a gust of wind blows leaves are tossed around and even smaller particles are stirred up in the process.  This is what can happen inside your own body.  It can cause sneezing, itching, red eyes, and other ailments that relate to allergies.  When the liver is not calm, it can create not only symptoms of allergies, but also a host of other issues.  The emotion of the liver is anger and when out of balance this feeling can assert itself.  Certain types of headaches and/or migraines can arise, and this is just to name a few characteristics of an unbalanced liver in the springtime.  Acupuncture works to alleviate these conditions.

Aside from allergic responses, changes in emotions can also parallel the transformation in season.  To best manage this period of renewal, both on a physical and emotional level, schedule your next visit for acupuncture so you can enjoy this beautiful spring weather!

Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)
908.288.7682
346 South Avenue
Suite 4
Fanwood, NJ 07023

 

 

Cooking with Young Living Essential Oils

by Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)

Cooking with Young Living Essential Oils, TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

If you are in the area check out this event!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cooking-with-young-living-essential-oils-tickets-15827209610

Fighting Metastatic Breast Cancer

by Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)

Fighting Metastatic Breast Cancer, TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren

The other night I received an e-mail that moved me beyond words. Not only was the letter eloquently written, but it was filled with compassion. Please take a moment to read his letter and the cause he is raising money for. Thank you and be well....

Hi :)

This is an email relating to a person you probably don't know…but you know me, and so know that it comes from the heart. A friend of mine's mother is fighting advanced breast cancer. We are fundraising to come up with the money necessary to send her to a holistic treatment clinic (http://gerson.org/gerpress/, but one in Mexico, not San Diego) before her next round of (debilitating, sadly) chemotherapy.

The forwarded message below contains more information. You might be asking yourself, why? Why should I donate my money to someone I don't even know, a friend of a friend? Well, when that thought came across my mind at least, I considered how different the situation would be for me if it was my mother who had cancer, whom I was raising money for. I would stop at nothing to help her. So I invite you to expand your circle of compassion to Zsaklin Steir.

Nobody is called on to donate beyond their means, which of course is different for everyone. The main thing is that this message spreads, and hopefully everyone who sees it will donate something. That is the trick to fundraising this way, and the amazing gift that this information, hyper-connected age affords us. At worst, it is mindless internet dawdling (we've all been there…); at best, it is this: opportunities to expand your sense of compassion and help those in need but not in your immediate vicinity. So please give from your heart, or at least pass on this message.

Together, we can make a difference in someone's life. A mother's. And I would say mothers deserve at least that much for what they've done and what they do.

Thanks,

Love,
Steve

http://www.gofundme.com/metastaticbreastca

Don't Fear the Needle.

by Lauren Daniels, L.Ac. Dipl. Ac. (NCCAOM)

One of the most commonly asked questions from my first-time patients is if acupuncture hurts, as they are afraid of needles.  Trypanophobia, the fear of needles, is not uncommon.  However, this fear is quickly allayed after the calming effects of a patient’s first treatment settle in.

Actually, acupuncture needles may not quite be what you expect them to be at all.  Each flexible, single-use needle is hair-thin and you will likely not even feel them as they are gently being inserted.  Here is an image that compares an acupuncture needle’s width to similarly sized objects (including a medical syringe).  And rest assured, the insertion of an acupuncture needle does not share the intensity of a hypodermic injection.  As a matter of fact at least five acupuncture needles can fit into a hypodermic needle at once!

 Please don’t let your fear of needles stop you from trying acupuncture.  I assure you that the benefits of acupuncture far outweigh the fear of needles and once the benefits begin to present themselves you will truly understand the art behind Chinese medicine. 

 If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me for reassurance or consultation.  I can always be reached at 908.288.7682 or via e-mail at info@tlcacupuncture.com. 

 Don't Fear the Needle., TLC Acupuncture in Fanwood, Westfield, Scotch Plains, Clark, Edison, South Plainfield, Berkeley Heights, Watchung, Warren